The Flaming Lips – Tickets – College Street Music Hall. – New Haven, CT – March 8th, 2017

The Flaming Lips

Manic Productions and Premier Concerts Present:

The Flaming Lips

A Place To Bury Strangers

Wed, March 8, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$40.00

This event is all ages

This event is General Admission Standing Room on the Floor and Reserved Seated in the Balcony.

The Flaming Lips
The Flaming Lips
The Flaming Lips are an American rock band, formed in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in 1983.

Melodically, their sound contains lush, multi-layered, psychedelic rock arrangements, but lyrically their compositions show elements of space rock, including unusual song and album titles—such as "Psychiatric Explorations of the Fetus with Needles", "Free Radicals (A Hallucination of the Christmas Skeleton Pleading with a Suicide Bomber)" and "Yeah, I Know It's a Drag... But Wastin' Pigs Is Still Radical". They are also acclaimed for their elaborate live shows, which feature costumes, balloons, puppets, video projections, complex stage light configurations, giant hands, large amounts of confetti, and frontman Wayne Coyne's signature man-sized plastic bubble, in which he traverses the audience. In 2002, Q magazine named The Flaming Lips one of the "50 Bands to See Before You Die".

The group recorded several albums and EPs on an indie label, Restless, in the 1980s and early 1990s. After signing to Warner Brothers, they scored a hit in 1993 with "She Don't Use Jelly". Although it has been their only hit single in the U.S., the band has maintained critical respect and, to a lesser extent, commercial viability through albums such as 1999's 'The Soft Bulletin' (which was NME magazine's Album of the Year) and 2002's 'Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots'. They have had more hit singles in the UK and Europe than in the U.S. In February 2007, they were nominated for a 2007 BRIT Award in the "Best International Act" category. By 2007, the group garnered three Grammy Awards, including two for Best Rock Instrumental Performance.

In 2008, the band's long-awaited, seven-years-in-the-making film Christmas on Mars made its debut at the Sasquatch Festival in George, Washington; that fall, the movie and its soundtrack were released as a CD/DVD set. During 2007 and 2008, the Lips began working on the follow-up to At War with the Mystics, taking a looser, more experimental approach than they had in years. The results were released as Embryonic in fall 2009, followed by the band's quirky remake of the Pink Floyd classic 'Dark Side of the Moon'.

The band then shied away from full-length releases for the next couple years, opting instead to work with a number of collaborators on various limited-edition EPs. Working with artists like Neon Indian, Prefuse 73, and Lightning Bolt, the Lips released tracks over the next couple of years in various nontraditional formats including USB keys embedded in gummy skulls, limited-edition vinyl, and candy fetuses. Their series of team-ups came to a head in 2012 when the band released 'The Flaming Lips and Heady Fwends', which collected songs from their previous collaborations as well as new material recorded with artists like Ke$ha, Bon Iver, and Erykah Badu. For 2013's bleak 'The Terror', the Lips reteamed with Dave Fridmann, recording in a matter of days and using their collection of vintage synths as the album's musical focus.

The Lips collaborated with Cyrus on a full-length album, 'Miley Cyrus & Her Dead Petz', which was released for free online in August of 2015. Following the album's digital release, the artists toured together. In November of 2015, the Lips released 'Heady Nuggs 20 Years After Clouds Taste Metallic: 1994-1997', a three-CD or five-LP compilation including the 'Clouds Taste Metallic' album, the 1994 odds-and-ends EP 'Providing Needles for Your Balloons', a further rarities collection titled 'The King Bug Laughs', and a previously unreleased concert recorded in Seattle in 1996.

The Flaming Lips have announced a new album called Oczy Mlody, their follow-up to 2013’s The Terror, 2014’s Beatles covers record With a Little Help From My Fwends and last year's Miley Cyrus collaboration Miley Cyrus and Her Dead Petz. Oczy Mlody is out January 13 (Wayne Coyne's birthday) via Warner Bros. Records.

Oczy Mlody:

01 Oczy Mlody
02 How??
03 There Should Be Unicorns
04 Sunrise (Eyes of the Young)
05 Nigdy Nie (Never No)
06 Galaxy I Sink
07 One Night While Hunting for Faeries and Witches and Wizards to Kill
08 Do Glowy
09 Listening to the Frogs With Demon Eyes
10 The Castle
11 Almost Home (Blisko Domu)
12 We a Famly
A Place To Bury Strangers
A Place To Bury Strangers
"There are moments where I'm really scared on stage," admits A Place to Bury Strangers bassist Dion Lunadon, "where it's really foggy and I know someone's swinging a guitar around. I don't give a f*** though; if a guitar is about to hit me in the head, oh well. It's going to make for a better show."

He should know. After joining the Brooklyn-based trio in 2010, it only took a few shows before Lunadon smashed his bass against his face. The freshly drawn blood trickled like rain off of a tin roof. But since the band often plays in the dark, he couldn't actually see what happened. He had to keep going, and hope for the best.

"That's the most intense fear and feeling -- when you go to a show and you're actually scared," says frontman Oliver Ackermann, a co-founder of the soon-to-be-shuttered Death By Audio DIY space that's hosted its fair share of frantic, life-affirming shows.

"Or you can palpably feel the danger in the music," adds Lunadon, "like it's going to fall apart at any moment and the players doing it are so in the moment they don't give a shit about anything else. They're just going for it. It's a gutter kinda vibe; everything about it is icky and evil and dangerous."

The same could be said for A Place to Bury Strangers' fourth album, 'Transfixiation.' Rather than fixate on precious recording techniques and minute details, the members of the group -- Ackermann, Lunadon, and hard-hitting drummer Robi Gonzalez -- trusted their instincts and tried to keep things as pure as possible. If that meant a mess of cross-contaminated microphones and mud-caked mistakes, so be it. Music is much more exhilarating when it's unpredictable, and from the tortured straight-to-tape transmission of "I Will Die" and molten funk melodies of "Straight" to the violent guitar spasms, cannon-like drums and not-so-idle threats of "Deeper," this is very much an unpredictable record. Gonzalez makes his recording debut with the band here and he's helped push the band's recorded sound closer to the intense level of its infamous live shows.

Considering how controlled the chaos feels at every turn -- the mark of a band at the peak of their powers -- it's hard to imagine that 'Transfixiation' almost didn't happen. Having spent nearly two straight years on the road, the musicians figured they'd parlay that momentum into a new record as soon as they got settled back home. And while the self-produced sessions at Death By Audio led to some fantastic material, Ackermann hit a wall near the end of that initial month. He needed a long break.

"The way it was broken off was so intense," he says. "It got to be too much, where we -- or at least I -- almost had a meltdown or something. I felt like we had to stop, and I wasn't even sure if the album was going to get finished or if we were going to be friends again."

Two months passed by with little communication between the three members. Lunadon worked on other recordings, and Gonzalez retreated to a mountainous region in the Pacific Northwest. Meanwhile, Ackermann pieced together the set: fresh compositions, songs that had already been recorded in Brooklyn, and the fruit of an earlier recording session with Serena Maneesh frontman Emil Nikolaisen in Norway. Thankfully, everything clicked. A Place to Bury Strangers became whole again, with a bond -- onstage and off -- that's arguably stronger than it's ever been.

"Things go wrong all the time," explains Lunadon, "so with anything that's thrown at us, we have to make the best of it and turn something into gold instead of falling apart."

"The one thing we have in common is this fire when we're playing," adds Gonzalez. "I don't know; it's real intense."

The well-oiled Lunadon-Gonzalez rhythm section has adapted to Ackermann's unique style of playing -- the pair has embraced the chain-linked effects (Ackermann has produced custom pedals for such major artists as Lou Reed, My Bloody Valentine, The Flaming Lips, and Nine Inch Nails) and minimized the drum fills.

"It's not rocket science," says Lunadon, "but rock 'n' roll shouldn't be. When you start to do bluesy scales or try to be too fancy, it doesn't work for us. You gotta keep it simple and seize the moment."
Venue Information:
College Street Music Hall.
238 College Street
New Haven, CT, 06510
http://www.collegestreetmusichall.com

Parking Information