The Decemberists – Tickets – College Street Music Hall. – New Haven, CT – July 27th, 2015

The Decemberists

Manic Productions and Premier Concerts Present:

The Decemberists

Lady Lamb

Mon, July 27, 2015

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

$46.00

Tickets at the Door

This event is all ages


$1 USD per sold ticket will be sent to Revolutions Per Minute (RPM), a United States-based 501(c)3, to administer charity donations on behalf of the artist.

The Decemberists
The Decemberists
"In some ways, this album was four years in the making," says Colin Meloy, frontman and primary songwriter of the Decemberists. "We were on hiatus, so we had all the time we could want, no schedule or tour, no expectations."With the ability to work at their own pace, the resulting record, What a Terrible World, What a Beautiful World, is the band's most varied and dynamic work, both musically and emotionally. Since their earliest recordings more than a decade ago, the Decemberists have always been known for their sense of scope and daring—from "The Tain," an eighteen-and-a-half minute 2004 single based on an Irish myth to their last two ambitious, thematic albums, The Hazards of Love and The King is Dead. This time, though, Meloy explains that they took a different approach: "Let's make sure the songs are good, and eventually the record will present itself." The Decemberists—Meloy, Chris Funk (guitars), Jenny Conlee (keyboards), Nate Query (bass), and John Moen (drums)—had announced that they would be taking a break when their touring cycle finished following the release of 2011's The King is Dead. Meloy wanted to spend time with his family and work on the children's book series that became the acclaimed, best-selling Wildwood trilogy. To be sure, they had reached a new peak in their career: King entered the Billboard album charts at Number One, and the track "Down by the Water" was nominated for a Grammy in the "Best Rock Song" category.Even during the hiatus, the group remained visible: they released an EP of outtakes from the album titled Long Live the King; contributed the song "One Engine" to the Hunger Games soundtrack; and put out We All Raise Our Voices to the Air, a live album documenting their ferocious intensity on stage. They even had the honor of appearing in animated form on The Simpsons, and performed on the season six finale of Parks and Recreation.Mostly, however, Meloy was concentrating on the Wildwood series—the 1,500-page saga of two seventh-graders who are drawn into a hidden, magical forest,illustrated by his wife, Carson Ellis. So when the band reassembled in May 2013, the plan wasn't to make an album in their usual way."Typically we book four or five weeks in the studio and bang out the whole record," says Meloy. "This time, we started by just booking three days, and didn'tknow what we would record. There was no direction or focus; we wanted to just see what would come out. We recorded 'Lake Song' on the first day, live, and then two more songs in those three days. And the spirit of that session informed everything that came after."

They reconvened in the fall and added some more songs. Gradually, over the course of a year and a half, the album came into focus. What was initially apparent was a fuller, richer sound. "There was a grandiosity to the songs in different ways," says Meloy, citing Leonard Cohen's 1977 collaboration with Phil Spector, Death of a Ladies' Man, as a reference point. "We were layeringtextures, adding strings and dedicated backing vocals—the early songs created the peaks of the record, and that started to dictate the overall tone and tenor."The first batch of songs, Meloy notes, represented the more personal side of his songwriting, a change from the strong narrative thrust that characterized much of the Decemberists' work. "Writing books as this raw, fantastic narrator has been the outlet for that part of my brain," he says. "Having a family, having kids, having this career, getting older—all of these things have made me look more inward. So some of these songs are among the more intimately personal songs I've ever written."Perhaps most notable is "12-17-12," a song named for, and inspired by, the date that President Obama addressed the nation following the Newtown school shootings, and read the names of the victims. "I watched that speech and was profoundly moved," says Meloy. "I was hit by a sense of helplessness, but also the message of 'Hold your family close,' and this was my way of marking that for myself." This bewildering, conflicted feeling came out in a phrase near the end of the song—"what a terrible world, what a beautiful world"—that gave the album its title.As the sessions continued, other elements of the writing and the sound surfaced and a more rounded picture emerged. "As soon as I finished the books, I immediately started writing more narrative songs," Meloy says. "'Cavalry Captain,' 'Carolina Low,' those all started coming out. But there was a more subtle voice coming in; I wanted moments of levity, a little tongue-in-cheek. Also, we figured out that the big, pop sound we were making would also make the quieter moments more still, create more dynamic peaks and valleys."Without a deadline, the Decemberists were also able to explore every song to completion. "Usually you have to let some songs slide because of time constraints," Meloy says, "but nothing was relegated to the b-side pile, everything was given a fair shake. Which is a blessing and a curse—we ended up with 18 songs, and each had champions and detractors. There were a multitude of albums you could potentially make—somber, over-the-top pop, folk—and I think every band member would have created a different record."Ultimately, What a Terrible World, What a Beautiful World found its final form, a distillation of the best things about this remarkable band. A new way of working led to a renewed excitement about the next chapter for the Decemberists. "I've never lived with a record for so long," says Colin Meloy, "documenting my shifts

and changes as a songwriter, with a real sense of time passing. And there's something very freeing about working on music with absolutely no agenda, and just letting the songs become themselves."
Lady Lamb
Lady Lamb
To many, Lady Lamb is an enigma. Her songs are at once intimate and unbridled– both deeply personal and existentially contemplative. Aly Spaltro is a fearless performer who can command a pitch black stage with nothing more than her voice. Yet, when the band bursts in and the lights come up, what began as a demonstration of restraint shifts seamlessly into an emphatic snarl. On her newest work, After, Spaltro explores dualities further – giving equal attention to both the internal and external, the before and after. Her most palpable fears and memories are on display here, with a familiar vulnerability even more direct than her last effort. After boasts driving rhythms, bold melodies, candid lyricism, and a growling sonic stamp that is all her own.

Spaltro’s formative years were full of change – moving houses, cities, and countries every three years until she landed in her family’s home state of Maine. It was here that Spaltro found her voice among thousands of films at Bart & Greg’s DVD Explosion, an independent rental store in the small coastal town of Brunswick. During the day Spaltro would rent movies to the locals. At night she would lock up, pull out her 8-track recorder, and create songs completely uninhibited by musical conventions, learning to play and sing as she hit record. These creations brought forth nearly one hundred recordings, twelve of which were carefully curated and fully realized on her 2013 full-length studio debut Ripely Pine (released on Ba Da Bing! Records). Ripely Pine garnered praise for its lyrical intricacies, emotive vocals, and often unpredictable musicality, introducing Spaltro as a formidable new artist.

In between tours, Spaltro returned home, focusing with laser-like intent on writing, arranging, and demoing the songs on After. These new works – which found Spaltro co-producing with her Ripely Pine partner Nadim Issa at his Brooklyn studio, Let ‘Em In – are sonically vibrant, with an assertive use of grit and brightness. Thematically, they provide direct insight into Spaltro’s rumination on mortality, family, friendships, and leaving home.

There are many songs on After that explore themes of a much larger scale. In “Heretic” Spaltro sings of a childhood UFO sighting in Arizona. In “Batter” she dies in a plane crash, while in “Spat Out Spit” she questions whether she was even born at all. Alternatively, in “Billions of Eyes” Spaltro can “only see into her suitcase,” her mind simultaneously present and wandering as she “gnaws [her] way back home.” The tender and sparse “Ten” delves into her mother’s childhood diary, giving the listener a clear view throughout into some of Spaltro’s warmest memories of her loved ones. Ripely Pine was marked by an undeniable passion and confidence, but where it sometimes lacked in personal narrative and directness is where After shines. The last line on After encompasses the self-assurance of the work as a whole, stating “I know where I come from.” This theme is a constant throughout After, as Spaltro seeks to allow the listener to move in closer than ever before, to reflect on the past with grace, and envision the future with fervor. Spaltro invites us to contemplate the dualities that make us human, encouraging the celebration of both fear and love: internally and externally, before and after.
Venue Information:
College Street Music Hall.
238 College Street
New Haven, CT, 06510
http://www.collegestreetmusichall.com

Parking Information