Dan Deacon – Tickets – College Street Music Hall. – New Haven, CT – September 19th, 2015

Dan Deacon

Manic Productions, WYBC Yale Radio, and Premier Concerts Present:

Dan Deacon

ON AN ON, Eliot Sumner, Dosh

Sat, September 19, 2015

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$15.00

This event is all ages

Dan Deacon
Dan Deacon
With the success of Dan Deacon’s 2007 album Spiderman of the Rings, came an opportunity for the electronic-music iconoclast to increase the breadth and depth of his entire musical project. Deacon moved from self-contained computer music to orchestral epics. His interactive live show, honed in DIY spaces, was taken to museums and concert halls. He frequently expanded his performances to include a horde of side musicians. Gliss Riffer, an entirely self-produced record of almost all electronic sounds, is a return to Deacon’s Spiderman of the Rings-era process. He calls it “easily the most fun [he’s] ever had making a record.” After a string of large ensemble projects (including 2009’s Bromst and 2012’s America) Deacon longed for the “simplicity” of the days when he did nearly everything himself. So he made plans to sequester himself in his studio and conjure an album from the sketches and songs he had begun in the back of the van on the European leg of the America tour. Those plans were upended when he received a last-minute invitation to tour with Arcade Fire in August. Rather than lose momentum by pushing back his recording schedule, Deacon continued to make the record on the road. “I was mixing and arranging in the green room before sound check and each night back at the hotel.” Deacon said, “On days off I’d find a studio to track vocals or mix. When a studio couldn’t be found I dismantled a hotel bathroom, sealing the vents with towels and using all the bedding to turn it into a control room.” This is his first record to showcase his newfound appreciation for his vocal cords, an appreciation he gained after going through an extended bout of laryngitis. “I started thinking about how the voice is an instrument that expires,” he said, “and that made me want to make an album with the voice more exposed.” And that he did. While Gliss Riffer contains all the instrumental layering we’ve come to expect, the vocals are mixed with a prominence (“Feel the Lightning,” “Learning to Relax”) and, at times, a clarity (“When I Was Done Dying”) that have never been heard on a Dan Deacon record before. All the vocals are performed by Deacon himself, even the female voice on “Feel the Lightning” is the product of vari-speed recording techniques. This album also marks the first time Deacon replaced his digitally realized parts with analog synthesizers, giving Deacon the opportunity to experiment with synthesizers in the same way he experimented with strings and wind instruments on America. Deacon travelled to Asheville, N.C., to record with Moog’s at-the-time-unreleased Sub 37 analog synth. Gliss Riffer is the first record in the world to feature the instrument. Despite being predominately electronic, Gliss Riffer’s sonic palette is informed by his post-Spiderman material. The Disklavier, a MIDI-fed player piano first heard on Bromst, is present here. (This time around, Deacon ran it so hard it broke.) Cross-rhythms suggestive of America’s orchestral opus “USA” and Deacon’s art music work (including a Carnegie Hall performance and film score for Francis Ford Coppola) are also in evidence. What Gliss Riffer shares with Spiderman of the Rings as a musical experience is an aesthetic directness and ecstatic energy. Gliss Riffer trades in exuberant, uncontained fun. Lyrical images of lightning, oceans, lakes, and roads crop up frequently as stand-ins for freedom and self-realization. The tracks were started on the ever-changing landscapes that greet a touring musician. The lyrics, on the other hand, were mostly written in Deacon’s studio, a room with no windows and no air conditioning in Baltimore’s sweltering summer where it was easy to imagine being somewhere else. So while Gliss Riffer is all about fun, it’s figured dramatically. It’s a euphoria tempered by yearning and set in defiance of life’s nagging anxiety. “Happiness takes time,” we are reminded by tremolo vocals in the middle of the supremely danceable “Mind on Fire.” The bliss on this record is well-earned.
ON AN ON
ON AN ON
ON AN ON is an American experimental-pop band out of Minneapolis, MN, made up of long-time friends and collaborators, Nate Eiesland (vocals, guitar), Ryne Estwing (bass, vocals) and Alissa Ricci (keys, vocals). On July 24, 2015 they will release their sophomore album And The Wave Has Two Sides.

"This is another first record for us in a way." says keyboardist Alissa Ricci "This time we came into the studio as a band. 'Give In' (our debut) was us learning to think less and trust our instincts. What you hear on that record is a band beginning. It's mysterious, and flawed, and honest."

Formed in 2012, ON AN ON began when the trio congregated in the Toronto studio Stars & Sons with producer Dave Newfeld to start a brand new band. "We didn't plan what we were going to sound like ahead of time. We just had some demos and a blank slate. It felt like selling all of your possessions and starting fresh", states Ricci. Their debut Give In captured the origins and exploration of their new sound in real-time.

"We had each been in bands prior to ON AN ON and had day jobs and careers, but we just decided to go for it", says Eiesland, "We gave all that up so we could jump into the deep end of something new. It was a risk, but it felt right, and as an artist if you don't trust your gut you're screwed." Critics confirmed that the risk had paid off. Give In topped many best of 2013 lists and ON AN ON were touted by TIME, NPR and MTV as one of the new bands to watch in the first year of their existence.

After touring across the US and Europe for a year and a half, pairing with artists such as Junip, Tennis and Geographer, and at festivals including Bonnaroo, Governor's Ball and Iceland Airwaves, the band returned to their hometown of Minneapolis to begin writing what would become their sophomore follow-up. During this period, the band began to explore live tracking, allowing them to approach the writing process more collaboratively, vocalist Nate Eiesland adds, "By tracking everyone in the same room at one time, we tried to capture the interaction between the parts we were playing. There's a subtle energy to things that get recorded that way; a tension in the sound. When we would make it to the end of what everyone in the studio knew was THE take, there was always this moment of pure electric silence. It was a magic feeling."

One of the most important factors during this process was to continue to explore new musical territory and to build on the sound they had developed while touring. "Making another Give In would have been the easy thing to do", says bassist Ryne Estwing. "This time we wanted to make something more direct and visceral. We decided to use a more old school recording approach to capture that immediacy." With a fresh collection of songs written, ON AN ON ventured to California to record at the famous Sunset Sound in Los Angeles with legendary producer Joe Chiccarelli (White Stripes, Spoon, The Shins, My Morning Jacket). The influence of sun-drenched Californian landscape can be clearly heard in the new record, pushing the vibrancy and the energy of their debut to ever-greater heights.

The first insight into the record is the hauntingly suspenseful "Drifting". This track encapsulates the band at their most vulnerable yet; "Drifting is inspired by falling asleep behind the wheel and trying to forget unforgettable things. We've never had a song that sounded this naked." Second single "It's Not Over" shows the band in an entirely different light, delivering a summer dance-floor anthem, with a driving bass line and inescapably catchy, highly-processed drum beat. The song "is about long-term love. It's about regaining a sense of context to help in the moments, or the seasons, of insecurity that are a part of loving someone forever", says Eiesland. "It's funny that the first two songs we put out from this album are the ones that were the furthest from our comfort zone."
Eliot Sumner
'Last summer Sumner emerged with a new EP, as a solo artist under her own, infinitely cooler moniker: her birth name, Eliot Sumner (and yes she is the daughter of Sting). There's still a synthy 80s bent to her tunes, as exemplified by recent song "Dead Arms & Legs," and particularly "After Dark" ... but there's a newly minted swagger to her pop.' --Noisey
Dosh
Dosh
With the flash and efficiency of digital song-making technologies, it can be easy to lose sight of the merits of that which is analog. Martin Dosh, then, has become something of an accidental preservationist, keeping instruments like Rhodes keyboards and an ancient Korg EX 800 sequencer alive by using them in his innovative solo works and collaborations with the likes of Andrew Bird and Bonnie "Prince" Billy.

Over the years, he's graciously given over rich compositions like "First Impossible" (which became Andrew Bird's "Not a Robot but a Ghost") to collaboration, but with Milk Money, his latest solo release, Dosh decided to let his arrangements stand on their own. Blending elements of hip hop, jazz drumming, vocal samples and electronic production, he builds a variety of warm soundscapes. His mixes of piano, percussion, vocals and more are broad, room-filling compositions, created by running the elements of each track through guitar amplifiers simultaneously, creating a "re-amp" effect that allows each song to breathe. The result is a collection of open pieces, like the wonder-tinged "Kisses," that invite the listener to step inside.

Looping pedals are integral to Dosh's music, and he uses them here to great effect. With a stage set-up that looks like a fort erected by a kid with only musical instruments for building materials — boxed in on all sides by keyboards, drums and complicated boards of knobs begging to be jiggled — Dosh uses loops to construct his soundscapes solo. The resulting complexity and breadth of his songs is most evident on the record's closing track, a nearly 25-minute number Dosh composed for a duo performance with Wilco's Glenn Kotche at the request of the Walker Arts Center in Dosh's hometown of Minneapolis. Beginning with a single pinging note on the Rhodes, it winds through many cycles, eventually blossoming into an ebullient flurry of sound.

Milk Money is the recording of a vital mind alive with the possibility of what it can create. It brims with a warmth that can't be digitized. It's the satisfying, immediate thwack of drumstick again drumhead, the visceral pleasure of a grown-up boy at play inside a musical fort.
Venue Information:
College Street Music Hall.
238 College Street
New Haven, CT, 06510
http://www.collegestreetmusichall.com

Parking Information